Cloud

Everything you need to know about the CKS Kubernetes Security Specialist certification (except the answers)

Everything you need to know about the CKS Kubernetes Security Specialist certification (except the answers)

Having just passed the exam myself, I wanted to do a write-up whilst many of these thoughts are fresh in my mind. Disclaimer: opinions are my own, not my employer’s, etc. What is it? The Certified Kubernetes Security Specialist (CKS) is a certification course offered by the Linux Foundation. It builds on the skills required by the Certified Kubernetes Administrator (CKA) certification with a focus on Kubernetes and cloud security. It’s a relatively new certification, having been released in November 2020, and requires the practitioner to firstly hold an active CKA certification.
Keeping setuptools updated in OpenShift Python S2I

Keeping setuptools updated in OpenShift Python S2I

After a recent commit to a Python project that I work on, I noticed that my resulting OpenShift pod had begun crashlooping after the rebuild. A quick check of the pod logs showed why: for some reason, it could no longer find the alembic module, despite that being a transitive dependency of SQLAlchemy, which my project already had in its requirements.txt. Curious, I checked the build logs and noticed an odd error during the dependency install:
Patching Kubernetes resources with kubectl

Patching Kubernetes resources with kubectl

In this blog we’re going to learn how we can use kubectl’s patch command to modify the configuration of Kubernetes-managed resources via the command-line. Before we do that though, we’ll go through a quick primer on how you can display Kubernetes resources so that you know what and where to patch. Getting Kuberenetes resources One of the first kubectl commands a Kubernetes beginner will become intimately acquainted with is the get command.